freedie and nietzsche here – the official how-to-quilt.com schnoodles

penny is working on a new quilt, which is kind of fun for us since she is explaining everything as she goes.

it’s almost as good as a quilt as you go project, but she is sewing all of the blocks together this time – before she layers and quilts it.

(see, we’ve learned at least that much!)

anyway, she made a bunch of blocks and then she added these little strips between each block and row on the quilt top.

we were curious, since the only strips we have seen around here end up being cut into really small squares and triangles.

she explained that these strips get to stay that way so they can separate the blocks, and they are called sashing.

as you can imagine, we were really confused, since we couldn’t imagine why the blocks wanted to be separated from each other.

or why quilters would want to separate the blocks.

after all, one of our most favorite places is our outside nighttime safe spot (where the coyotes can’t get to us), and it has some nice blocks stacked right next to each other – and it makes a great place to sit and tease the coyotes.

we can’t imagine what that would look like if it had little strips of fabric between the blocks (especially since the blocks are concrete).

it’s all very confusing to us puppies – we’ve got so much to learn.

kind of like quilters of all ages!

so today, we thought we’d let you know about an article penny wrote that kind of explains sashing and has links to other articles, too:

http://how-to-quilt.com/articles/1209-sashing.php

Baby Quilt with Simple Sashing

Baby Quilt with Simple Sashing

For years the only quilts I made were just blocks.

Then a bunch of my friends were having babies, and I decided to create a series of quilts that used hearts that were machine embroidered onto small squares.

After I had a stack of hearts, I started sewing them together into quilts.

The thing was – I got bored just sewing them right next to each other, so I started adding sashing strips between them.

Then one day I got really bold and added small squares between the sashing strips that surrounded each block.

It wasn’t an original idea, I’d seen it many times, but it took a while for me to get creative enough to try it myself.

Adding cornerstones (small squares) to sashing is easy, yet it makes your quilt look much more interesting – and your family and friends will think you have been quilting for decades!

For some ideas about sashing with cornerstones, visit:

http://how-to-quilt.com/articles/1201-sashing-with-cornerstones.php

This simple quilt is set on point and has sashing with cornerstones

This simple quilt is set on point and has sashing with cornerstones

Your blocks can range from the very simple to the very complex, and they will still benefit from sashing.

Sashing is what goes between the blocks in a quilt. Like quilt blocks, sashing can be very simple or it can be as complex as your quilt blocks. And some quilts have no sashing at all.

The easiest sashing is simple strips of fabric between each of the blocks. This forms a kind of frame around each block, setting them apart while adding some interest to the quilt.

One very easy way to add interest to your sashing is to use multiple strips of fabric between the blocks.

Discover several different methods for adding sashing between the blocks of your quilts:

http://www.how-to-quilt.com/articles/1202-sashing-with-stripes.php

quilt with sashing

This quilt has strips of fabric between the blocks for sashing

Many quilters love Quilt as You Go projects, where you piece and then quilt one block at a time instead of sewing the quilt top together then quilting it.

As a result, you finish individual blocks which will be connected to each other to become a quilt.

You’ll find my list of plusses, itty-bitty minuses, tips and step-by-step technique when you visit:

http://www.how-to-quilt.com/articles/2024-quiltasyougotips.php

Happy Quilting!

Penny

When you are new to quilting, it is easy to confuse the terms ‘border’ and ‘sashing.’ After all, both have a similar purpose.

The easiest way to remember the difference is that the border goes around an entire quilt. Sashing creates borders between the individual quilt blocks.

Today we’ll talk about sashing – something you can add to, tweek or take away from most any quilt pattern you use. It all depends on your personal preference:

http://www.how-to-quilt.com/articles/2511-border-or-sashing.php

Happy Quilting!

Penny

Sashing is one of many ways to enhance the look of your quilts.

Instead of placing blocks directly next to each other, you simply add strips of fabric between the blocks and rows.

And, depending on the fabric you use, sashing can create a subtle or dynamic “picture frame” around all or some of your quilt blocks.

You’ll find both written instructions and detailed photographs for adding sashing to any quilt when you visit:

http://www.how-to-quilt.com/articles/1207-adding-sashing.php

Happy Quilting!

Penny

In the late 1880s and early 1900s, quilters got creatively crazy and began using a variety of different fabric types. Where traditional patchwork quilters had been using cotton and wool, some of the more bold quilters began using fabric such as velvet and silk.

It’s believed this trend led to the emergence of “crazy quilts” and the necessity for paper foundation piecing.

You’ll learn more about crazy quilts, as well as how to create a wall hanging with crazy sashing made from old silk ties, when you visit:

http://how-to-quilt.com/articles/1203-crazy-pieced-sashing.php

Happy Quilting!

Penny

Many quilters love Quilt as You Go projects. In a Quilt as You Go project, you piece and then quilt one block at a time (instead of sewing the quilt top together then quilting it).

As a result, you finish individual blocks which will be connected to each other to become a quilt.

You’ll find brief step-by-step instructions – and a how-to video - when you visit:

http://www.how-to-quilt.com/articles/2025-quiltasyougomethod1.php

Oh, and don’t forget to register and download the handout for our Quilt as You Go Webinar this Tuesday, March 22nd:

Register:  https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/877849344

Handout:  http://www.how-to-quilt.com/QuiltasYouGoWebinarHandout.pdf

Happy Quilting!

Penny

Making a quilt should be a fun and relaxing experience, so try to choose fabrics you enjoy working with. And, if you’re a beginner, you might want to keep things fairly simple.

Two-color blocks have a unique appeal. To be most effective, choose colors that contrast. And you might be surprised to see how moving the blocks around can really change the look of your quilt:

http://www.how-to-quilt.com/2colorquilts.php

Happy Quilting!

Penny

Sashing is strips of fabric that fit between the blocks in a quilt.

Cornerstones are squares of fabric that are pieced within the sashingand fit in at the corners of the blocks.

Like quilt blocks, sashing and cornerstones can be very simple or as complex as your quilt blocks.

I’ll show you a couple of quilts with sashing and cornerstones – and how they were constructed – when you visit:

http://www.how-to-quilt.com/articles/1204-sashing-on-point-with-cornerstones.php

Happy Quilting!

Penny

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