Your blocks can range from the very simple to the very complex, and they will still benefit from sashing.

Sashing is what goes between the blocks in a quilt. Like quilt blocks, sashing can be very simple or it can be as complex as your quilt blocks. And some quilts have no sashing at all.

The easiest sashing is simple strips of fabric between each of the blocks. This forms a kind of frame around each block, setting them apart while adding some interest to the quilt.

One very easy way to add interest to your sashing is to use multiple strips of fabric between the blocks.

Discover several different methods for adding sashing between the blocks of your quilts:

http://www.how-to-quilt.com/articles/1202-sashing-with-stripes.php

quilt with sashing

This quilt has strips of fabric between the blocks for sashing

Many quilters love Quilt as You Go projects, where you piece and then quilt one block at a time instead of sewing the quilt top together then quilting it.

As a result, you finish individual blocks which will be connected to each other to become a quilt.

You’ll find my list of plusses, itty-bitty minuses, tips and step-by-step technique when you visit:

http://www.how-to-quilt.com/articles/2024-quiltasyougotips.php

Happy Quilting!

Penny

When you are new to quilting, it is easy to confuse the terms ‘border’ and ‘sashing.’ After all, both have a similar purpose.

The easiest way to remember the difference is that the border goes around an entire quilt. Sashing creates borders between the individual quilt blocks.

Today we’ll talk about sashing – something you can add to, tweek or take away from most any quilt pattern you use. It all depends on your personal preference:

http://www.how-to-quilt.com/articles/2511-border-or-sashing.php

Happy Quilting!

Penny

Sashing is one of many ways to enhance the look of your quilts.

Instead of placing blocks directly next to each other, you simply add strips of fabric between the blocks and rows.

And, depending on the fabric you use, sashing can create a subtle or dynamic “picture frame” around all or some of your quilt blocks.

You’ll find both written instructions and detailed photographs for adding sashing to any quilt when you visit:

http://www.how-to-quilt.com/articles/1207-adding-sashing.php

Happy Quilting!

Penny

In the late 1880s and early 1900s, quilters got creatively crazy and began using a variety of different fabric types. Where traditional patchwork quilters had been using cotton and wool, some of the more bold quilters began using fabric such as velvet and silk.

It’s believed this trend led to the emergence of “crazy quilts” and the necessity for paper foundation piecing.

You’ll learn more about crazy quilts, as well as how to create a wall hanging with crazy sashing made from old silk ties, when you visit:

http://how-to-quilt.com/articles/1203-crazy-pieced-sashing.php

Happy Quilting!

Penny

Many quilters love Quilt as You Go projects. In a Quilt as You Go project, you piece and then quilt one block at a time (instead of sewing the quilt top together then quilting it).

As a result, you finish individual blocks which will be connected to each other to become a quilt.

You’ll find brief step-by-step instructions – and a how-to video – when you visit:

http://www.how-to-quilt.com/articles/2025-quiltasyougomethod1.php

Oh, and don’t forget to register and download the handout for our Quilt as You Go Webinar this Tuesday, March 22nd:

Register:  https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/877849344

Handout:  http://www.how-to-quilt.com/QuiltasYouGoWebinarHandout.pdf

Happy Quilting!

Penny

Making a quilt should be a fun and relaxing experience, so try to choose fabrics you enjoy working with. And, if you’re a beginner, you might want to keep things fairly simple.

Two-color blocks have a unique appeal. To be most effective, choose colors that contrast. And you might be surprised to see how moving the blocks around can really change the look of your quilt:

http://www.how-to-quilt.com/2colorquilts.php

Happy Quilting!

Penny

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